Are gums more sensitive during pregnancy?

Pregnancy gingivitis is caused by the hormonal changes that increase the blood flow to the gum tissue and cause your gums to be more sensitive, irritable, and swollen. These hormonal changes also hinder the body’s normal response to bacteria which can cause periodontal infections.

Why are my gums so sensitive during pregnancy?

Your body is working overtime to support both you and your little one, which results in increased blood flow in the body. This increased blood flow can create sensitive, swollen gums that are tender to the touch.

Do gums hurt in early pregnancy?

Sensitive Teeth And Pregnancy

Pregnancy causes a rush of hormones and increases blood flow thus causing swollen gums and sore teeth. Pregnant women are more susceptible to gum disease and sensitive teeth because they react differently to bacteria. This increases plaque build-up and potential damage to teeth.

Can pregnancy affect your gums?

Pregnancy can lead to dental problems in some women, including gum disease and tooth decay. During pregnancy, hormones affect gums and teeth. Brushing teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and visiting your dentist will help keep your teeth and gums as healthy as possible during pregnancy.

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When do sore gums start in pregnancy?

The same pregnancy hormones that cause your mucous membranes to swell and your sinuses to clog up also inflame your gums from around week 15 of pregnancy on, making them more likely to bleed easily.

Is private dental care free when pregnant?

Dental care is free from the time your pregnancy is confirmed right through to your child’s first birthday. You simply need to apply for a maternity exemption certificate (form FW8) which you can get from your midwife, GP or health visitor.

What are the symptoms for being 5 weeks pregnant?

Early pregnancy symptoms (at 5 weeks)

  • a metallic taste in your mouth.
  • sore breasts.
  • nausea (also known as ‘morning sickness’, though it can strike at any time)
  • mood swings.
  • new likes and dislikes – anyone for a slice of orange with pickle? …
  • a heightened sense of smell.
  • needing to wee more frequently.

What symptoms do you get when your 1 week pregnant?

Pregnancy symptoms in week 1

  • nausea with or without vomiting.
  • breast changes including tenderness, swelling, or tingling feeling, or noticeable blue veins.
  • frequent urination.
  • headache.
  • raised basal body temperature.
  • bloating in the belly or gas.
  • mild pelvic cramping or discomfort without bleeding.
  • tiredness or fatigue.

Can gingivitis harm my baby?

Gingivitis can cause complications in your mouth and even for your pregnancy. Periodontitis is a more advanced stage of gum disease that can spread down to the bone. If you develop periodontitis, your baby-to-be may be at an increased risk of preterm birth or low birth weight, among other health conditions.

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When does pregnancy gingivitis go away?

Although the gingivitis generally subsides shortly after birth, it should nonetheless be periodically monitored by your dentist (during and after pregnancy), in order to prevent the gingivitis from turning into the more serious (and irreversible) form known as periodontitis.

Can gingivitis cause miscarriage?

Periodontal disease in an expectant mother can even lead to miscarriage or stillbirth. And the cause can be as simple as gestational gingivitis—something that is easily overlooked, even by doctors. The key to limiting the impact of gum disease on pregnancy lies in controlling inflammation.

What does pregnancy gingivitis look like?

Pregnancy gingivitis is very similar to the gingivitis that occurs outside of pregnancy, and can include a mild inflammation of the gums due to plaque buildup, with red and sore gums that bleed when probed. If you have red, sensitive, or swollen gums during pregnancy, you’re not alone.

Do I need to tell my dentist Im pregnant?

Tell your dentist (and doctor) if you are pregnant. Routine dental care can be done any time during pregnancy. Any urgent procedure can be done, as well. All elective dental procedures, however, should be postponed until after the delivery.

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